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8.8 Poisons

For the purpose of this manual the word “Poison” will be used interchangeably with the word “Toxic”. OSHA defines “Toxic” as a chemical falling within any of the following categories:

  • A chemical that has a median lethal dose (LD50) of more than 50 milligrams per kilogram, but not more than 500 milligrams per kilogram of body weight when administered orally to albino rats weighing between 200 and 300 grams each.
  • A chemical that has a median lethal dose (LD50) of more than 200 milligrams per kilogram, but not more than 1000 milligrams per kilogram of body weight when administered by continuous contact for 24 hours (or less if death occurs within 24 hours) with the bare skin of albino rabbits weighing between two and three kilograms each.
  • A chemical that has a median lethal concentration (LC50) in air of more than 200 parts per million, but not more than 2000 parts per million by volume of gas or vapor, or more than two milligrams per liter but not more than 20 milligrams per liter of mist, fume, dust, when administered by continuous inhalation for one hour (or less if death occurs with in one hour) to albino rats weighing between 200 and 300 grams each.

OSHA draws a distinction between toxic chemicals and acutely toxic chemicals. For more information on acutely toxic chemicals, see Particularly Hazardous Substances. OSHA also provides definitions for other health hazards on their website. Under the DOT hazard class system, poisons are listed as hazard class 6.

As a general rule of thumb, all chemicals should be treated as poisons and proper procedures such as maintaining good housekeeping, use of proper PPE, good personal hygiene, etc., should be followed.

When working with known poisons, it is very important to have thought an experiment through, addressing health and safety issues before working with the poison. Safety Data Sheets (SDS) and other chemical references should be consulted before beginning the experiment. Some questions to ask before working with poisonous chemicals:

  • Do I need to use the poisonous chemical or can a less toxic chemical be substituted?
  • What are the routes of entry into the body for the poison (inhalation, ingestion, injection, or skin absorption)?
  • What are the signs and symptoms of potential chemical exposure?
  • What are the proper PPE required (type of glove, safety glasses vs. splash goggles, face shield, etc.)?
  • Does the chemical require any special antidote?
  • What are the emergency procedures to be followed?

When working with highly toxic chemicals, you should not work alone. Always wear proper PPE and always wash your hands with soap and water when finished, even if gloves were worn. Be aware that poisonous mixtures, vapors, and gases can be formed during an experiment. Be sure to research both the reactants and products of the chemicals you will be working with first. Additional information can be found in the Exposure Monitoring section and Routes of Chemical Entry section.

If you think you may have received an exposure to a poisonous substance, or may have accidentally ingested a chemical, seek medical attention immediately and/or call the Poison Control Center at 1-(800) 222-1222 or the University Police at 911 from a campus phone or 607-255-1111 from a cell phone or off campus phone. If possible, bring a copy of the SDS with you. Upon completion of seeking medical attention, complete an Injury/Illness Report.